Nyctaginaceae

Boerhaavia = Boerhavia

Boerhavia L. [Not native]

Last edited by Pieter B. Pelser, 23 November 2020

Photos
  1. Boerhavia diffusa L., Sp. Pl. (1753) 3; --Merr., Fl. Manila (1912) 197; EPFP 2 (1923) 133; --Stemmerik, Fl. Males. ser. 1, 6 (1964) 454. --Boerhavia coccinea Mill., Gard. Dict. ed. 8 (1768) 4. Americas. Not native to the Philippines. Weed in open places in and around towns, road sides, along streams and in open forest. Photos
  2. Boerhavia erecta L., Sp. Pl. (1753) 3. Americas. LUZON: Laguna (Hernaez 1461, TAI). Not native to the Philippines. Open fields, grassland,

Ceodes J.R.Forst. & G.Forst.

Last edited by Pieter B. Pelser, 11 July 2020

Photos

  1. Ceodes longirostris (Teijsm. & Binn.) Merr. & L.M.Perry, J. Arnold Arbor. 20 (1939) 328; --Rossetto & Caraballo-Ortiz, PhytoKeys 152 (2020) 131; --Pisonia longirostris Teijsm. & Binn., Tijdschr. Nederl. Ind. 25 (1863) 401; --Merr., EPFP 2 (1923) 134; --Stemmerik, Fl. Males. ser. 1, 6 (1964) 463. Lesser Sunda Isls, Moluccas, New Guinea, Solomon Isls, Philippines. SULU.
  2. Ceodes umbellifera J.R.Forst. & G.Forst., Char. Gen. Pl., ed. 2. (1776) 142; --Rossetto & Caraballo-Ortiz, PhytoKeys 152 (2020) 132; --Pisonia umbellifera (J.R.Forst. & G.Forst.) Seem., Bonplandia 10 (1862) 154; --Merr., EPFP 2 (1923) 134; --Stemmerik, Fl. Males. ser. 1, 6 (1964) 460; --Ceodes umbellifera J.R.Forst. & G.Forst., Char. Gen. Pl. (1775) 71. Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Reunión, Mascarenes, Comoros, Andaman Isls, Vietnam, Hainan, Taiwan, Ryukyu Isls, throughout Malesia, particularly in the E part, also in Christmas Is, to Australia and the Pacific: Bonin Isls, Micronesia (Palau, Yap and Truk), Melanesia (Bismarck Archipelago, Solomon Isls, Fiji, Samoa, Tanna, Rapa, Mangareva, Pitcairn, Marquesas, Tubuai Isls, Lord Howe Is, Norfolk I, New Zealand. Photos

Mirabilis L. [Not native]

Last edited by Pieter B. Pelser, 23 November 2020

Photos
  1. Mirabilis jalapa L., Sp. Pl. (1753) 177; --Merr., Fl. Manila (1912) 197; EPFP 2 (1923) 132; --Stemmerik, Fl. Males. ser. 1, 6 (1964) 451. Native of Peru, now cultivated pantropically as an ornamental or medicinal plant. Occasionally escaping near towns. Cultivated up to c. 1400m. Flowers are ephemeral, opening at c. 4-4:30 pm (and closing at c. 9:00 am), hence the common names ‘alas-cuatro’ or ‘four o’clock’. Photos

Pisonia L.

Photos
  1. Pisonia aculeata L., Sp. Pl. (1753) 1026; --Merr., Fl. Manila (1912) 196; EPFP 2 (1923) 133; --Stemmerik, Fl. Males. ser. 1, 6 (1964) 467. (Sub)tropical America, Africa (W & E coasts), Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Sri Lanka, India (Deccan, Coromandel, S Concan), Andaman Isls, Tenasserim, Vietnam, Laos, Hainan, Taiwan, C Sumatra, Peninsular Malaysia, Java, Lesser Sunda Isls (Bali, Sumbawa, Sumba, Flores, Timor, Alor, Wetar), Borneo (Sabah), Philippines, Sulawesi (SE & SW), SW New Guinea to Australia (N Arnhem Land, Queensland, New South Wales), New Caledonia. Photos
  2. Pisonia grandis R.Br., Prodr. (1810) 422; --Merr., EPFP 2 (1923) 134; --Stemmerik, Fl. Males. ser. 1, 6 (1964) 464. --Pisonia alba Span., Linnaea 15 (1841) 342; --Merr., Fl. Manila (1912) 196; EPFP 2 (1923) 133. Madagascar, Mascarenes (Frigate Is, Rodrigues), Seychelles, Laccadive and Maldive Isls, Sri Lanka, India, Andaman Isls, Nicobar Isls, S China Sea isls (Pratas, Parcel), E Taiwan, throughout Malesia (except Sumatra) to Australia (Gulf of Carpentaria isls) and the Pacific: Micronesia (Marianas, Carolines), Marcus Is, Wake Is, Marshall Isls, Gilbert Isls, New Caledonia, Loyalty Isls, Polynesia (throughout, except Hawaii). Dry to semi-dry places, along coasts, sandy or rocky. Often dominant on isolated oceanic islets and atolls. Pisonia ‘alba’ is an almost echlorophyllose cultigen of Pisonia grandis.

Cultivated, not naturalized:

  1. Bougainvillea X buttiana Holttum & Standl., Bot. Ser. Field Mus. 23 (1944) 44; --Pancho & Bardenas, Baileya 7 (1959) 99; --Stemmerik, Fl. Males. ser. 1, 6 (1964) 456. Discovered in 1910 from Colombia, and taken into cultivation by many European firms. Introduced in Singapore in 1923. Now only known in cultivation.
  2. Bougainvillea glabra Choisy in DC., Prodr. 13, 2 (1849) 437; --Pancho & Bardenas, Baileya 7 (1959) 99; --Stemmerik, Fl. Males. ser. 1, 6 (1964) 457. Brazil, where doubtfully wild. Flowered in Europe in 1860, mentioned from Bogor in 1866, from India in 1869, from Singapore in 1879. Very commonly planted. Flowers under everwet conditions.
  3. Bougainvillea peruviana Humb. & Bonpl., Pl. Aequin. 1 (1808) 147; --Pancho & Bardenas, Baileya 7 (1959) 97; --Stemmerik, Fl. Males. ser. 1, 6 (1964) 456. Native of NW South America, introduced in Singapore in 1938. Three garden varieties. Flowers a little after dry weather. Grows probably best on light soils.
  4. Bougainvillea spectabilis Willd., Sp. Pl. 2 (1799) 348, as ‘Buginvillaea’; --Merr., Fl. Manila (1912) 196; EPFP 2 (1923) 133; --Pancho & Bardenas, Baileya 7 (1959) 100; --Stemmerik, Fl. Males. ser. 1, 6 (1964) 457. Peru. Introduced in Europe in 1829, recorded from Bogor in 1866, from Singapore in 1879. Very commonly planted. Flowers only in or in response to dry weather. Photos

Literature

Chen, S-H & M-J Wu. 2007. A taxonomical study of the genus Boerhavia (Nyctaginaceae) in Taiwan. Taiwania 52: 332-342

Rossetto, EFS & MA Caraballo-Ortiz. 2020. Splitting the Pisonia birdcatcher trees: re-establishment of Ceodes and Rockia (Nyctaginaceae, Pisonieae). PhytoKeys 152: 121-136

Stemmerik, JF. 1964. Nyctaginaceae. Flora Malesiana series 1, 6: 450-468


Pelser, P.B., J.F. Barcelona & D.L. Nickrent (eds.). 2011 onwards. Co's Digital Flora of the Philippines. www.philippineplants.org

Copyright © 2011, Co's Digital Flora of the Philippines

Last updated 23 November 2020