Musaceae

Ensete Bruce ex Horan.

Last edited by Pieter B. Pelser, 12 August 2017
  1. Ensete glaucum (Roxb.) Cheesman, Kew Bull. 2 (1948) 101; ≡ Musa glauca Roxb., Pl. Coromandel. 3 (1819) t. 300; Teodoro, PJS 10 c (1915) Bot. 387; Merr., EPFP 1 (1922) 221. Distribution: LUZON: Cavite, Laguna, MINDORO. Native.
    • var. glaucum. = Musa troglodytarum L. var. dolioliformis Blanco, Fl. Filip. (1837) 855. Distribution: Myanmar, Nepal to Papuasia, Philippines. LUZON: Cavite, Laguna. Notes: Ravines, etc., at low and medium elevation. Native.

Cultivated, not naturalized

  1. Ensete ventricosum (Welw.) Cheesman, Kew Bull. 2 (1948) 101; ≡ Musa ventricosa Welw., Apont. (1859) 587. = Ensete edule Bruce ex Horan., Prodr. Monogr. Scitam. (1862) 40. = Musa ensete J.F.Gmel., Syst. Nat. 13(2) (1791) 567. Notes: Indigenous in Africa. Not naturalized. Cultivated, not naturalized.

Musa L.

Last edited by Pieter B. Pelser, 6 August 2022
  1. Musa acuminata Colla, Mem. Gen. Musa 25 (1820) 66. = Musa cavendishii I.M.Lamb ex Paxton var. hawaiiensis N.G.Teodoro, PJS 10 c (1915) 410. Distribution: Andaman Isls, Bangladesh, Borneo, China, India, Java, Laos, Lesser Sunda Isls, Malay Peninsula, Myanmar, Nicobar Isls, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Sulawesi, Sumatra, Thailand, Vietnam. LUZON: Laguna, MINDORO. Native.
    • ssp. errans (Blanco) R.V.Valmayor, Philip. Agric. Scientist 84 (2001) 328; ≡ Musa errans (Blanco) N.G.Teodoro, PJS 10 c (1915) Bot. 390; Merr., EPFP 1 (1922) 221; ≡ Musa troglodytarum L. var. errans Blanco, Fl. Filip. (1837) 247. Distribution: Endemic to the Philippines. LUZON: Laguna. Native.
  2. Musa × alinsanaya R.V.Valmayor in R.V.Valmayor et al., Philip. Agric. Scientist 87 (2004) 117; Type: Lelita Gonzal VH 1280 (Leyte State University, Botanical Herbarium, holo), Leyte: Baybay, Leyte State University, Musa Germplasm Bank, 10-Jul-2003. Distribution: Endemic to the Philippines. Notes: The plant was taken into the cultivation from Philippines (Valmayor 2001). The name was published illegitimately twice (Valmayor 2001: 330; Valmayor et al. 2002: 240) (McNeill et al. 2006: Art. 37.7), since the holotype was not indicated. Valmayor’s (2001) description is based upon a putative hybrid M. banksii × textilis, characterised by Brewbaker & Gorrez (1956: 263). Native.
  3. Musa balbisiana Colla, Mem. Accad. Sci. Torino 25 (1820) 384. Distribution: Philippines, Tropical & Subtropical Asia. LUZON: Apayao, Bataan, Bulacan, Laguna, Rizal, MINDORO. Native.
    • var. balbisiana. = Musa rosacea Jacq., Pl. Rar. Horti Caesari Schoenbrunnensis 4 (1804) 23; Type: Plate 445 in Jacquin (1804; lecto). = Musa errans var. botoan N.G.Teodoro, PJS 10c (1915) Bot. 391; Merr., EPFP 1 (1922) 221. Distribution: India to Papuasia, Philippines. LUZON: Apayao, Bataan, Bulacan, Laguna, Rizal. Notes: Low and medium elevation forests. Native.
  4. Musa coccinea Andrews, Botanist’s Repository 1 (1797) 343. = Musa uranoscopos Lour., Fl. Cochinch. (1790) 645, nom. illeg., nom. superfl. Distribution: SE Asia. Notes: Introduced and occasionally planted on account of its very showy red bracts. Native.
  5. Musa × paradisiaca L., Sp. Pl. (1753) 1043; Teodoro, PJS 10 c (1915) Bot. 412; Merr., Fl. Manila (1912) 154; EPFP 1 (1922) 221. = Musa nigra Perr., Mém. Soc. Linn. Paris 3 (1825) 131. Notes: Plantain or cooking bananas. A number of forms or varieties occur in the Philippines, which from a species standpoint are hardly discerned from Musa sapientum L., the bananas. Blanco (1837), Teodoro (1915) and Quisumbing (1919) have attempted to document all these entities in the Philippines. These were subsequently summarized by Merrill (1922) and a few others. Naturalized.
  6. Musa × sapientum L., Syst. ed. 10 (1759) 1303; Teodoro, PJS 10 c (1915) Bot. 393; Merr., EPFP 1 (1922) 222; ≡ Musa x paradisiaca L. ssp. sapientum (L.) Kuntze, Rev. Gen. Pl. 1 (1892) 692. = Musa × chapara Perr., Mém. Soc. Linn. Paris 3 (1825) 131. Notes: Described from material of Philippine origin, type unknown and diagnosis is too poor to allow identification, Musa chapara has been regarded as a synonym of Musa sapientum L. (Schumann 1900; Champion 1967). The familiar table bananas, usually distinguished from the plantains (Musa paradisiaca L.) in the consistency and character of the mature fruits. Musa sapientum has been repeatedly shown to represent Musa cultivars (AB, AAB, ABB group). Therefore all infraspecific taxa described represent various cultivars, unless otherwise shown. According to Simmonds (1960), Linnaeus originally applied the name M. sapientum to the “Silk fig” (AAB group). Native.
  7. Musa textilis Nees, Anal Cienc. Nat. 4 (1801) 123; Teodoro, PJS 10 c (1915) Bot. 388; Merr., EPFP 1 (1922) 227; Type: not found and requires neotypification. = Musa mindanaensis Miq., Fl. Ned. Ind. 3 (1859) 588. Distribution: Endemic to the Philippines. Notes: Extensively cultivated in the wetter parts of the Philippines. Abaca or Manila hemp. The species is variable, and sundry forms have distinctive local names. Native.

Cultivated, not naturalized

  1. Musa troglodytarum L., Sp. Pl. ed. 2 (1763) 1478. = Musa uranoscopos Lour., Fl. Cochinch. (1790) 645, nom. illeg., nom. superfl. Notes: Cultivated. Not naturalized. Cultivated, not naturalized.

References