Brassicaceae

Cruciferae

Brassica L. (Not native)

Last edited by Pieter B. Pelser, 16 January 2021
  1. Brassica juncea (L.) Czern., Consp. Pl. Chark. (1859) 8; Merr., Fl. Manila (1912) 214; Jonsell, Fl. Males. ser. 1, 10 (1988) 545; ≡ Sinapis juncea L., Sp. Pl. (1753) 668. = Brassica integrifolia (H.West) O.E.Schulz in Urban, Symb. Antill. 3 (1903) 509; Merr., EPFP 2 (1923) 207; ≡ Sinapis integrifolia H.West, Bidr. Beskr. Ste Croix (1793) 296. Distribution: W Asia. Notes: Cultivated in the Philippines: mostaza. Note by P.B. Pelser (8-Nov-20): "in towns, near houses, etc., planted and spontaneous" (Merrill 1923). Naturalized.

Cultivated, not naturalized

  1. Brassica oleracea L., Sp. Pl. 2 (1753) 667; Merr., EPFP 2 (1923) 207. = Brassica pekinensis Skeels, U.S.D.A. Bur. Pl. Industr. Bull. No. 227 (1911) 51. Notes: Brussels sprouts, cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, etc. Not naturalized (Merrill 1923).
  2. Brassica rapa L., Sp. Pl. 2 (1753) 666. Notes: Not naturalized.

Capsella Med. (Not native)

  1. Capsella bursa-pastoris Med., Pflanzengatt. 1 (1792) 85; Merr., EPFP 2 (1923) 208; Backer & Bakh.f., Fl. Java 1 (1963) 192; Jonsell, Fl. Males. ser. 1, 10 (1988) 550. Cosmopolitan. Distribution: LUZON: Benguet, Mountain Province. Notes: Cosmopolitan weed, probably native in Europe, introduced in Malesia and recorded from the highlands of E Java, Philippines, and E New Guinea. Probably more widespread. A common weed in Bontoc. Naturalized.

Cardamine L.

Last edited by Pieter B. Pelser, 31 May 2021
  1. Cardamine hirsuta L., Sp. Pl. (1753) 655; Backer & Bakh.f., Fl. Java 1 (1963) 191; Jonsell, Fl. Males. ser. 1, 10 (1988) 554. Distribution: ?Africa, Europe. Notes: Widespread weed and naturalized in many areas including the Philippines. Lowlands up to c. 2200m in the Cordillera Highlands of N Luzon. Naturalized.
  2. Cardamine manshurica (Kom.) Nakai, Tyosen-Syokubutu (1914) 113; Kim et al., Korean Journal of Plant Taxonomy 45 (2015) 141; ≡ Cardamine parviflora var. manshurica Kom., Trudy Imp. S.-Peterburgsk. Bot. Sada 22 (1903) 370. = Cardamine flexuosa auct. non With.; Jonsell, Fl. Males. ser. 1, 10 (1988) 554 (pro parte). = Cardamine regeliana auct. non Miq.; Merr., EPFP 2 (1923) 208. Distribution: China, Japan, Korea, Philippines, Taiwan. LUZON: Benguet, Mountain Province, MINDANAO. Notes: Occasional in open damp places, 1200-1800m. Native.

Lepidium L. (Not native)

  1. Lepidium virginicum L., Sp. Pl. (1753) 645; Merr., EPFP 2 (1923) 207; Backer & Bakh.f., Fl. Java 1 (1963) 187; Jonsell, Fl. Males. ser. 1, 10 (1988) 548. Distribution: N America. LUZON: Cagayan, Nueva Vizcaya. Notes: Widespread as a weed in all warm countries. A weed in towns, in some regions occurring along sandy seashores. Naturalized.

Nasturtium W.T.Aiton (Not native)

Last edited by Pieter B. Pelser, 5 December 2021
  1. Nasturtium officinale R.Br. in Aiton, Hort. Kew. ed. 2, 4 (1812) 110; Merr., EPFP 2 (1923) 208; Quisumb., Med. Pl. Philip. (1951) 335; Backer & Bakh.f., Fl. Java 1 (1963) 191. = Rorippa nasturtium-aquaticum (L.) Hayek, Sched. Fl. Str. Exs. 3-4 (1905) 22; Jonsell, Fl. Males. ser. 1, 10 (1988) 555; ≡ Sisymbrium nasturtium-aquaticum L., Sp. Pl. (1753) 657. Distribution: Afghanistan, Africa, Europe, Middle East, Pakistan, W Asia. LUZON. Notes: Widely cultivated and spread with European settlements to temperate and montane areas throughout the world. In the Philippines commonly cultivated in the Cordillera Highlands of N Luzon, where it also escapes from cultivation, following water courses, and establishing themselves as weeds. Naturalized.

Raphanus L. (Not native)

Last edited by Pieter B. Pelser, 9 July 2017

Cultivated, not naturalized

  1. Raphanus raphanistrum L., Sp. Pl. 2 (1753) 669.
    • ssp. sativus (L.) Domin, Beih. Bot. Centralbl. 26 (1910) 255; ≡ Raphanus sativus L., Sp. Pl. (1753) 669; Merr., Fl. Manila (1912) 214; EPFP 3 (1923) 208; Jonsell, Fl. Males. ser. 1, 10 (1988) 546. Notes: Only known in cultivation, said to be probably originated from hybrids between forms of Raphanus rapahanistrum L. In Malesia reportedly escaping and becoming weedy at least in Java, probably elsewhere. Widely cultivated in the Philippines, from the lowlands to 2400m. Raddish, labanos.

Rorippa Scop.

Last edited by Pieter B. Pelser, 21 October 2017
  1. Rorippa dubia (Pers.) H.Hara, J. Jap. Bot. 30 (1955) 196; ≡ Sisymbrium dubium Pers., Syn. Pl. 2 (1806) 199. = Rorippa heterophylla (Blume) Williams, Fl. Trin. & Tobago (1929) 24; Jonsell, Fl. Males. ser. 1, 10 (1988) 559; ≡ Nasturtium heterophyllum Blume, Bijdr. (1825) 50. = Nasturtium indicum auct. non (L.) DC.; Merr., Govt. Lab. Publ. (Philipp.) 27 (1905) 17; Fl. Manila (1912) 213; EPFP 2 (1923) 208. Distribution: Bangladesh, China, India, Japan, Java, Laos, Lesser Sunda Isls, Malay Peninsula, Moluccas, Myanmar, Nepal, New Guinea, Philippines, Sulawesi, Sumatra, Taiwan, Thailand, Tibet, Vietnam. LUZON, MINDANAO. Notes: Near sea-level to 2000m, in open moist ground in cultivated lands and water courses, 250-1500m. Naturalized.
  2. Rorippa hybosperma (O.E.Schulz) Jonsell, Fl. Males. ser. 1, 10 (1988) 559; ≡ Nasturtium hybospermum O.E.Schulz, Bot. Jahrb. 55 (1918) 268. Distribution: New Guinea, Philippines. MINDANAO: North Cotabato. Notes: Lowland streams and rivers in marshes. Native.

Possibly present

  1. Rorippa indica (L.) Hiern, Cat. Afr. Pl. 1 (1896) 26; ≡ Sisymbrium indicum L., Mant. Pl. (1767) 93. Distribution: Africa, Bangladesh, China, India, Korea, Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand, Tibet, Vietnam. Notes: Reported for the Philippines by Moody (1989) as a weed in rice, but no specimens cited.

Literature